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Trail Ridge Road - Rocky Mountain National Park

Amazing day in the Colorado Rockies!

Trail Ridge Road is only open in the summer and this year it didn't open until June. It was in the mid-90's in Thornton and very hazy, you couldn't even see the front range.  Good day to get out, there was a little bit of the haze at the top of the world but is was cool and refreshing.

Photo notes: I am really loving the new Nikon! I shot a .07 stop under today in hopes to bring out a bit more detail from the haze.  fun shoot!


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